Why Adopt an Adult Cat?

12 Reasons to Adopt an Adult Cat

  1. What you see is what you get. Adult cats already know who they are. Kittens are undeniably cute, but you never know what the future holds, how large they may get, what their personality will ultimately be, etc. An adorable little kitten will be an adult in the blink of an eye.
  2. Adult cats aren’t at a shelter because they are defective or worn out. They may have simply outlived their former owners or been unable to join them at a hospital, nursing home, or new apartment. Some cats get lost and end up at a shelter. And many are brought to a shelter after a family member develops allergies, or an aversion to the family cat. (In those cases, it is the previous owner that is defective, not the cat).
  3. Adult cats aren’t as “chewsy.” Kittens have a tendency to chew things, lots of things. Whether teething or just exploring bits of the world around them, kittens chew on shoes, the corners of books, ear lobes and fingers, carpet tassels, electrical cords, drapery strings, plants, and much, much more. Most adult cats don’t chew inappropriately at all.
  4. Kittens stumble in blindly, where adult cats fear to tread. Two well-known clichés about cats are: “curiosity killed the cat” and “cats have nine lives.” And curiosity usually leads to the loss of about eight of a kitten’s lives in its first year. Kittens tend to get into much more trouble resulting in accidents and injuries (see, for example, the reference to “chewing electrical cords” above). Kittens eat things they shouldn’t, fall from high places, and generally worry you half to death.
  5. Kittens are lacking when it comes to licking. Few kittens have mastered the fine art of self-grooming. While adult cats may spend up to half their waking hours licking fur, kittens are just too busy enjoying life to clean themselves properly. When you consider that kittens are really just dust-mops with legs, and that they generally display marginal litter box etiquette, you might want to master the somewhat dangerous art of cat-bathing.
  6. If you have an older cat in your home and are looking for a friend for him or her, another adult cat may be the best choice. Kittens can be too playful and may upset your cat instead of providing companionship. A kitten may cause your resident cat to be more annoyed than amused.
  7. After a long day at the office, you may just want to come home and curl up with your furry friend—but most kittens prefer an action packed evening—lots of tousling, frolicking, and plenty of running and jumping. An adult cat will greet you at the door and be more than happy to curl up and watch your favorite shows on TV. They’ve already learned about the unconditional love thing.
  8. Adult cats may sleep at the foot of your bed, under the bed or in a cozy spot somewhere else in the house, while a kitten will most likely run around all night, doing anything possible to wake you up for more games. Adult cats are generally happy to sleep when you do and don’t try to attack your toes through the blankets in the middle of the night.
  9. Adult cats are quiet companions. They have well-developed manners, use the litter box and the scratching post without constant reminders. They won’t be climbing up your leg or your curtains, they won’t be swinging from your chandeliers, knocking down knick knacks or just running full speed ahead for no good reason. Adult cats sleep more, require less supervision, break fewer lamps, etc. With an adult cat, you will sleep better, relax more, and make fewer claims on your homeowner’s policy.
  10. Adult cats are usually a better choice for families with small children. Children can be rough on both cats and kittens, even when they mean no real harm. Kittens often play rough and are constantly underfoot. They’re sharp—they can’t help it, but kittens are all teeth and claws. Generally speaking, adult cats are more mellow, and often more patient with young children. The experience should be a good one for both the cat and the child. Ask to meet the shelter’s best “kid cats.” Kittens and children don’t mix.
  11. Adult cats don’t “litter” as much. Kittens play, sunbathe, build sandcastles, and even sleep in their litter boxes. And then there’s a game called “poo-hockey,” where a piece of dried waste is removed from the box and batted around the floor until it disappears under a major appliance or piece of furniture. People who adopt older cats happily miss this stage of feline development. Adult cats understand the purpose of a litter box and will usually cooperate with your efforts to keep theirs tidy.
  12. Many adult cats end up in shelters due to no fault of their own. Separated from their loved ones, surrounded by other cats, confined, confused, and sometimes frightened, many are emotionally devastated by their misfortune. Sadly, most people gravitate toward the cute, bouncy, big-eyed kittens. Older cats sit by and watch, as one loving family after another passes them over for a cute kitten. Adopting an adult cat is a way to say to a deserving animal “I believe in you.”

Kittens don’t stay kittens for long.

Kittens will always be popular, and most have no trouble attracting admirers. But for the abandoned, forgotten, and heartbroken adult cats, you just might be their last chance to have the love and warmth of a home where they can live out their years in comfort.

When properly cared for, cats often live well into their late teens, and sometimes into their early twenties. Typically, they will remain active and playful throughout most of their lives. Some may need a little extra patience while adjusting to a new home, but once they feel safe and secure again, they’ll offer years of faithful companionship and unconditional love.

We have several wonderful adult kitties looking for their loving forever homes. Please consider adopting an adult cat today!

Our mission is to end feline overpopulation in west Michigan through community education and empowerment.

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